Video

This is a listing of all Video.



Barber Shop
Short video of men getting haircuts in Delhi's INA Market

Divergent experiences of India and Pakistan after 1947
In this video, Partha Chatterjee (professor of anthropology, Columbia University) discusses how India and Pakistan have differed in their development. Pakistan's early political leaders were not from regions that became Pakistan, and local populations did not immediately become part of the government, though the Punjab elite were well represented in the army. Creating a strong central government for Pakistan proved difficult, and in 1956 the Pakistani army staged a coup. Since then the military has largely ruled the country, and many major institutions of government have not had a chance to develop. In India, by contrast, the foundations of crucial institutions were successfully laid, and despite phases of totalitarian rule and series of unsuccessful coalition governments, all parties assume that government operate within the terms of the Constitution. Many Indians complain of slow economic growth, which some put down to Indian democracy, but many consider this a price worth paying for freedoms not enjoyed elsewhere, including Pakistan. Pakistan presents rather bleak choices between the military elite and its popular opposition, which in recent years has tended to come from right-wing Islamist groups.

Excerpt from Interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf (fieldwork recording methods)
Brief excerpt from a 1983 interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf in which the anthropologist discusses the usefulness of durable field notebooks, which can be used record what has changed between visits to the same field site.

Excerpt from Interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf (Sherpa monasteries)
Brief excerpt from a 1983 interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf in which the anthropologist discusses the role of Tibetan Buddhism in Sherpa life, his concern in the 1970s that Sherpa monasteries were declining, and his pleasure at finding that they have since revived and are flourishing. 2:08:18-2:11:40.

Excerpt from Interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf (wife's role)
Brief excerpt from a 1983 interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf in which the anthropologist discusses the role his wife played in his fieldwork. 1:51:27-1:54:15.

Gandhi and Nehru
In this video Nicholas Dirks (professor of anthropology, Columbia University) argues that it is a mistake to characterize Gandhi as the spiritual leader, Nehru the political leader of India. While Gandhi was a man of spiritual conviction, he also possessed extraordinary political instincts and was highly aware of the political implications of anything he did. In his autobiography Gandhi describes his life in politics as a life of spiritual seeking; he saw no real distinction between the world of politics and the world of religion. Nehru came from a wealthier background and received a more thoroughly Western education, but in many ways was a similar character. His 1919 encounter with Gandhi changed his life; he joined the nationalist movement and became a follower of Gandhi both spiritually and politically.

Gauri Shankar Mandir
Short video of men making garlands to be sold to worshippers (used for religious offerings) outside a Hindu temple in Delhi

Memory, forgetting, and the ethics of writing history
In the video Partha Chatterjee (professor of anthropology, Columbia University) discusses attempts to write about the Partition based on oral histories, and the extent to which the events important to individuals may differ from the events important to official history. He also discusses the role of deliberate forgetting of past violence, and the ethics of reviving histories that people have chosen to forget.

Seminar with Professor M. N. Srinivas
Discussion with M. N. Srinivas, led by Jack Goody and Stephen Levinson

The 1975 Emergency
In this video, Partha Chatterjee (professor of anthropology, Columbia University) discusses the circumstances surrounding the 1975 Emergency declared by Indira Gandhi. He views it as the culmination of her efforts to create a stronger, more authoritarian Congress Party and to consolidate centralized political power in India. Gandhi declared the emergency to avoid being pressured to resign as prime minister after being found guilty of violating election laws in 1971. The political opposition was immediately jailed and normal politics completely suspended. The Emergency regime was short-lived. Media were so tightly controlled that there was no immediate threat to the regime, but it proved difficult to rule effecively when the normal processes of politics were suspended. Gandhi herself called for elections, assuming that she would win, but once the media opened up and people realized what the emergency regime had meant, she lost dramatically.

The Government of India Act
n this video Nicholas Dirks (professor of anthropology, Columbia University) notes that the 1935 Government of India Act was a major moment in the independence of India, but was also too little too late. The agreements that came out of the Round Table discussions in London were unsatisfactory. The British used the interests of Indian princes, who held power in a third of India under the provisions of an indirect British paramountcy, to slow down the transfer of power, and they treated Muslim political interests as fundamentally separate from Hindu interests. The Indian government set up under the auspices of the 1935 Act already showed the cracks that would lead to Partition.

The Quit India Movement
In this video Nicholas Dirks (professor of anthropology, Columbia University) explains the sense of betrayal felt by Indian leaders when Britain entered World War II and assumed India would follow suit, without consulting the elected Indian government. This disillusionment led to the Quit India movement of 1942, in which Indian leaders, including Gandhi, declared that until the British left India, the nationalist movement would cease to cooperate with the war effort and would regard British rule in India as illegitimate.

While Driving in Delhi
Short video interview about "kitty parties"