Audio

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Islam in the Modern World: Examination of the Role and Significance of Islam in Modern Society. 6 (of 8). India.

This BBC radio program discusses the relationship between Indian Hindus and Muslims; the 1947 partition and the creation of Pakistan (including personal memories); and current trends and political influences on Islam in India.


Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi: Memories of the Mahatma, by Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar

This BBC radio program features B. R. Ambedkar, distinguished lawyer and leader of the Untouchables who was opposed to Gandhi's policy relating to a separate electorate of the Untouchables. Ambedkar recounts memories of meeting Gandhi in 1929 and after the signing of the Poona Pact in jail. As he saw Gandhi in the capacity of an opponent, he feels that he saw more of the real man than his devotees. Ambedkar considers Gandhi "an episode" rather than "an epoch-maker" and believes he deceived the people and was two-faced over caste. He analyzes the status of the Untouchables (Harijan) and inconsistencies in Gandhi's apparent championship of them. Ambedkar feels that political independence would have come without Gandhi, but that the Transfer of Power was premature. He also examines motives behind Attlee's sudden change of policy. He relates his memories of the Poona Pact and his disagreement with Gandhi over the Untouchable suffrage and the electoral system he proposed. Ambedkar stresses that Gandhi worked entirely as a politician and was not a Mahatma.


Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi: Memories of the Mahatma, by Dr. B. C. Roy

In this BBC radio program, Francis Watson interviews B. C. Roy, who was one of Gandhi's doctors, and attended him constantly in his later years. In 1956 Roy became prime minister of West Bengal. Roy describes his first meeting with Gandhi in 1925 in Calcutta, and why Gandhi was a difficult patient; his treatment of Gandhi during his fasts, including the fast in Aga Kahn's palace when Gandhi's condition was very critical; Gandhi's frugal diet in 1931,and his ability to gain weight or sleep at will; and how once, in 1944, he managed to persuade Gandhi to take medicine. Roy explains why he feels that Gandhi was not a religious man; Gandhi's main belief was that individuals should develop, based on khadi (nonviolence), along with society. He relates anecdotes about Muslim maltreatment of women in the 1946 Noakhali riots; the strength Gandhi imbued into followers of the civil disobedience movement; and Gandhi's willingness to try other methods if his own did not achieve his aims.


Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi: Memories of the Mahatma, by G. V. Mavalankar

This BBC radio program features G. V. Mavalankar, who was Gandhi's lawyer and was Speaker in the Indian Lower House; he died in 1956. He relates his memories of his first meeting with Gandhi in Ahmedabad in 1916, when he felt that Gandhi's apparent obsession with everyday tasks was wrong, that he was "full of idiosyncrasies" and impolite to visitors. He recalls meeting Gandhi at the Gujarat Club in company with Sardar Patel (who would later become deputy prime minister of the newly independent India). Patel prevented Mavalankar from greeting Gandhi immediately, as he felt that the Mahatma did not like ceremony. Mavalankar analyzes how Gandhi persuaded people to follow nonviolent methods, and tells an anecdote about the 1931 census that illustrates Gandhi's relations with Patel.


Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi: Memories of the Mahatma, by G. V. Mavalankar

This BBC radio program features G. V. Mavalankar, who was Gandhi's lawyer and was Speaker in the Indian Lower House; he died in 1956. He relates his memories of his first meeting with Gandhi in Ahmedabad in 1916, when he felt that Gandhi's apparent obsession with everyday tasks was wrong, that he was "full of idiosyncrasies" and impolite to visitors. He recalls meeting Gandhi at the Gujarat Club in company with Sardar Patel (who would later become deputy prime minister of the newly independent India). Patel prevented Mavalankar from greeting Gandhi immediately, as he felt that the Mahatma did not like ceremony. Mavalankar analyzes how Gandhi persuaded people to follow nonviolent methods, and tells an anecdote about the 1931 census that illustrates Gandhi's relations with Patel.


Talking of Gandhiji: A Portrait. The first of four programmes of memories of men and women who knew him.

This BBC radio program begins with a short extract from a speech by Gandhi. The speakers provide details of Gandhi's character and appearance—"an extraordinarily plain-looking man"—and opinions on his political powers and integrity. Opinions on whether he was a saint, politician, both, or merely "a self-made man" are all expressed here. The program ends with an extract from Gandhi's "Spiritual Message to the World."


Talking of Gandhiji: The Conquest of India. The second of four programmes of memories of men and women who knew him.

The speakers who contribute to this BBC radio program discuss the growth of Gandhi from the "respected crank" of 1915 to the world figure he was at the time of his death. Especial points in his career are described: the 1922 trial, the fasts of 1924 and 1932, and the 1930 Salt March. Speakers' assessments of his work vary, but most emphasized among his campaigns are those for the Untouchables and for India's independence without losing the friendship of the British. The program includes a tribute from Lord Halifax, who as Lord Irwin and Viceroy of India made the Irwin-Gandhi Pact with Gandhi.


Talking of Gandhiji: The Last Phase. The fourth and last of a series of programmes on the life of Mahatma Gandhi.

This BBC radio program begins with a description of Gandhi's sober reaction to the Transfer of Power; he did not approve of Partition and was grieved by the violence between Hindus and Muslims. Ian Stephens gives an impression of his vitality in an interview. Impression of his new home and work in Noakhali (Bengal) and campaign of nonviolence there. Lord Mountbatten recalls his first meeting with Gandhi and the reconciliation he effected between Gandhi and Jinnah. Suhrawardy recollects his stay with Gandhi in Calcutta and his miraculous bringing of temporary peace to the city. But Gandhi was not satisfied and began another fast, which succeeded in quelling subsequent rioting; and then he came to Delhi. Tribute to the work of Indira Gandhi. Nehru pays tribute to "this weak little bundle of bones" and gives a picture of the comfort which the latter's daily prayer meetings brought to troubled Delhi. Description of his last fast to ensure that the new peace was made in the right spirit, and the love with which people regarded him. The program ends with a brief description of Gandhi's assassination.