social organization and behavior

This is a listing of every resource tagged with 'social organization and behavior'.



Regulation XVII, A.D. 1829 of the Bengal code (4 December 1829)
Legal code issued by the colonial government of India concerning the practice of sati

Petition of Hindus against the abolition of sati (19 December 1829)
Petition submitted to the Governor-General's Council by a group of Hindus, protesting the Council's abolition of sati.

The Relations of the Sexes
An excerpt from A History of the Arya Samaj (1915), describing improvements in the lives of Hindu women in India

"The Agitation Against Sati, 1987-88"
Essay on the contemporary debate over sati in India

"Strange Response"
Opinion piece on the Roop Kanwar sati case

"When Bodies Are Not Equal How Can Rights Be Equal?"
Opinion piece on sati in contemporary India

"Translation of a Conference between an Advocate for and an Opponent of the Practice of Burning Widows Alive"
Essay by Rammohun Roy concerning sati

"A Second Conference between an Advocate for and an Opponent of the Practice of Burning Widows Alive"
Essay by Rammohun Roy concerning sati

"Abstract of the Arguments Regarding the Burning of Widows, Considered as a Religious Rite"
Essay by Rammohun Roy arguing that Hinduism does not make self-immolation (sati) incumbent upon widows.

Seminar with Professor M. N. Srinivas (excerpts)
Discussion with anthropologist M. N. Srinivas, led by Jack Goody and Stephen Levinson, in which Srinivas reflects on his fieldwork in India.

Chatting in the Park
Photograph of four men seated on the ground, chatting, in South Extension Part II Market, Delhi

Women's Study Circle (I)
Photograph of women studying at the Jama Masjid in Delhi

Women's Study Circle (II)
Photograph of women studying at the Jama Masjid in Delhi

Women's Study Circle (III)
Photograph of women studying at the Jama Masjid in Delhi

While Driving in Delhi
Short video interview about "kitty parties," a type of social gathering for women

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi: Memories of the Mahatma, by Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar

This BBC radio program features B. R. Ambedkar, distinguished lawyer and leader of the Untouchables who was opposed to Gandhi's policy relating to a separate electorate of the Untouchables. Ambedkar recounts memories of meeting Gandhi in 1929 and after the signing of the Poona Pact in jail. As he saw Gandhi in the capacity of an opponent, he feels that he saw more of the real man than his devotees. Ambedkar considers Gandhi "an episode" rather than "an epoch-maker" and believes he deceived the people and was two-faced over caste. He analyzes the status of the Untouchables (Harijan) and inconsistencies in Gandhi's apparent championship of them. Ambedkar feels that political independence would have come without Gandhi, but that the Transfer of Power was premature. He also examines motives behind Attlee's sudden change of policy. He relates his memories of the Poona Pact and his disagreement with Gandhi over the Untouchable suffrage and the electoral system he proposed. Ambedkar stresses that Gandhi worked entirely as a politician and was not a Mahatma.


Syllabus for "Introduction to South Asian History and Culture"
An interactive syllabus, with hyperlinked digital resources, for Fall 2005 Columbia University anthropology course "Introduction to South Asian History and Culture." The course introduces seminal writings in the emergence of modernity on the Indian subcontinent, surveying major figures who helped shape social and political struggles during the British colonial period (roughly 1818-1947). It examines debates about religious reform, the role of women, nation formation, and caste stratification. The course analyzes, among other things, what was at stake in formulations of "tradition"and "modernity," how these formulations relate to contemporary issues and everyday life in South Asia, and how concepts such as gender, caste, religion, and nation change over time.

Modern South Asia Timeline: Social Movements, Political Events, and Intellectual Production
An interactive timeline, with hyperlinked documents, maps, short biographies, and other material, focusing on the modern history of the Indian subcontinent. The timeline covers the nineteenth-century religious reforms instituted by Indian intellectuals and British colonial officials and the nationalist movements leading to the 1947 independence of India and the creation of Pakistan. It provides a brief overview of earlier cultural and political events (the Brahmanical tradition, the Mughal period) that influenced debates of the British colonial period. It also lists key events, post-1947 to the 1990s, relevant to contemporary anthropological questions regarding caste, gender, and ethnic conflict. The timeline was prepared in conjunction with Columbia University anthropology course "Introduction to South Asian History and Culture" (Fall 2005).

Web site for "Introduction to South Asian History and Culture"
Class web site for Fall 2005 Columbia University anthropology course "Introduction to South Asian History and Culture." The website includes an interactive syllabus (with hyperlinked digital resources including texts, maps, photographs, audio, and video) and an interactive timeline of modern South Asia history (with further hyperlinked resources). The course introduces seminal writings in the emergence of modernity on the Indian subcontinent, surveying major figures who helped shape social and political struggles during the British colonial period (roughly 1818-1947). It examines debates about religious reform, the role of women, nation formation, and caste stratification, and analyzes what was at stake in formulations of "tradition" and "modernity," how these formulations relate to contemporary issues and everyday life in South Asia, and how concepts such as gender, caste, religion, and nation change over time. The timeline was designed to provide greater historical context for the course readings. It focuses particularly on the 1818-1947 period, but also provides a brief overview of earlier cultural and political eras and highlights key events, post-1947 to the 1990s, relevant to contemporary anthropological questions regarding caste, gender, and ethnic conflict.