Nepal

This is a listing of every resource related to Nepal.



More general:  South Asia

More specific:  Khumbu region (12), Solu region (3), Pharak region (2), Kathmandu (2), Khumjung (17), Jumla (1), Dailekh (1), Kunde (2), Namja Pass (1)
Nepal and Part of Tibet
Early 20th-century map of Nepal and a portion of Tibet

Annual Migrations of Three Sherpa Yak-herds of Khumjung
Black-and-white line map showing the seasonal migration routes of three Sherpa yak-owners from Khumjung, Nepal. The symbols are explained at the beginning of a four-page description of the yak migration that refers to the map as "Diagram B": triangles stand for permanently inhabited villages; rectangles for subsidiary settlements with crop-cultivations, circles for subsidiary settlements without fields, and crosses for unroofed shelters on high pastures.

Map of an area of midwestern Nepal
Hand-drawn map of an area of the midwestern region of Nepal encompassing the village of Simikot in the north, Tibrikot to the west, and the town of Dailekh to the south. Dotted lines possibly represent the route traveled by Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf during his 1958 tour of the area northeast of Pokhara.

Department store receipt
Receipt for supplies purchased by ethnographer Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf at a Kathmandu, Nepal department store.

Cover of Fürer-Haimendorf field notebook (notebook 5)
Cover of a Kingsway reporter's notebook used by Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf to record field notes during his 1957 stay among the Sherpas of Khumjung, Nepal.

Fürer-Haimendorf field notes (notebook 8, p. 86)
Page of Fürer-Haimendorf's field notes on the Sherpas (notebook 8, p. 86).

Fürer-Haimendorf field notes (notebooko 8, p. 97)
Page of Fürer-Haimendorf's field notes on the Sherpas (notebook 8, p. 97).

Annual Movement of Selected Herds
A chart showing month-by-month, from July to the following June, where various Sherpa yak owners of Khumjung and their herds are located.

Chart of yak ownership
Chart detailing ownership of yak among Sherpas of Khumjung, Nepal, over three years, including numbers of animals born, numbers that have died or been slaughtered, numbers sold and at what price.

Sketch of arrangement of houses, Khumjung village (notebook 8, p. 192)
One page of a sketch spread over two pages (notebook 8, pp. 192-93), depicting arrangment of houses and gomba in Khumjung village, Nepal.

Sketch of arrangement of houses, Khumjung village (notebook 8, p. 192)
One page of a sketch spread over two pages (notebook 8, pp. 192-93), depicting arrangment of houses and gomba in Khumjung village, Nepal.

Chart of Khumjung, Nepal householders
Large chart listing 52 householders of Khumjung, Nepal who own property, detailing clan membership or non-clan (Pheipa or Khamba) status, family relationships, and ownership of livestock and/or fields. Numbering of houses corresponds with house list for Khumjung, Nepal.

The Sherpas of Nepal, ch. 1, "Environment and Economy"
Opening chapter of The Sherpas of Nepal (1964), describing the areas of Nepal where the main concentrations of Sherpas live, the types of settlements they have created, and their agriculture, animal husbandry, trade, and crafts.

Fürer-Haimendorf field notes on Sherpas (notebook 5, pp. 120-123)
Four pages of field notes describing the demsang [dem-chang] ceremony (one of the steps toward marriage) among the Sherpas of Khumjung, Nepal, with descriptions of the obligations of families of the bride and the bridegroom.

Excerpt from field dictionary of the Sherpa language
Eight pages of Fürer-Haimendorf's field dictionary of the Sherpa language, covering the letter "T"; presented via an HTML page viewer.

Excerpt from Interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf (wife's role)
Brief excerpt from a 1983 interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf in which the anthropologist discusses the role his wife played in his fieldwork. 1:51:27-1:54:15.

Excerpt from Interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf (Sherpa monasteries)
Brief excerpt from a 1983 interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf in which the anthropologist discusses the role of Tibetan Buddhism in Sherpa life, his concern in the 1970s that Sherpa monasteries were declining, and his pleasure at finding that they have since revived and are flourishing. 2:08:18-2:11:40.

Excerpt from Interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf (fieldwork recording methods)
Brief excerpt from a 1983 interview with Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf in which the anthropologist discusses the usefulness of durable field notebooks, which can be used record what has changed between visits to the same field site.

Excerpts from Himalayan Traders: Life in Highland Nepal (pp. 12-15, 43-58)
Excerpts from chapter 1 ("The Sherpa Settlement Pattern") and chapter 2 ("A Farming Pattern Based on Transhumance") of Himalayan Traders: Life in Highland Nepal (1975).

House list for Khumjung, Nepal
Fürer-Haimendorf's house list, or village census, for Khumjung, Nepal, with all houses in the village numbered and all households described; presented via an html page viewer.

The regions of Khumbu, Pharak and Solu
Black-and-white line map of the Khumbu, Pharak, and Solu regions of Nepal, published in Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf's The Sherpas of Nepal (1964)

Excerpts from a letter to Sir Edmund Hillary, written in Kunde, August 3, 1964
Two typed pages of excerpts from a letter written by ethnographer Christoph von Fürer-Haimendorf to Sir Edmund Hillary concerning encouragement of local participation in the Sherpa schools and the addition of carpentry and Sherpa art to the curriculum, and voicing concern that novice monks learn to read and write Nepali and English along with lay Sherpas. Excerpts presumably prepared by Fürer-Haimendorf.

Fürer-Haimendorf field notes on Sherpas (notebook 8, pp. 80-98)
Nineteen pages of field notes, primarily describing marriage (zendi) ceremonies and rules of inheritance among the Sherpas of Khumjung, Nepal. The pages also include a genealogical chart, notes on customs concerning out-of-wedlock children, and the story of the death of a destitute Sherpa for whom funeral rites were not performed.

The Sherpas of Nepal, ch. 1, "Environment and Economy"
Opening chapter of The Sherpas of Nepal (1964), describing the areas of Nepal where the main concentrations of Sherpas live, the types of settlements they have created, and their agriculture, animal husbandry, trade, and crafts.

Excerpts from The Sherpas of Nepal (pp. 175-78, 251-54)
Exceprts from chapter 6 ("The Practice of Religion") and chapter 7 ("The Control of Invisible Forces") of The Sherpas of Nepal (1964).

Preface to The Sherpas of Nepal
Brief preface to The Sherpas of Nepal describing the author's research trips and acknowledging individuals and organizations contributing to his work.

Sherpas Through Their Rituals, ch. 6, "Offering Rituals: Problems of Religion, Anger, and Social Cooperation"
A chapter of Sherpas Through Their Rituals in which the author describes religious rituals through which the Sherpas seek the help of their gods, including protection from demons.

Fürer-Haimendorf diary entry (28 April, 1957)
Four-page entry in diary, dated 28 April, 1957, mainly devoted to describing a rite (tsirim) conducted by Sherpa lamas, with hyperlinks to the ethnographer's house list and dictionary of Sherpa language, and to a glossary.

Fürer-Haimendorf field notes on tsirim rite, with hyperlinks
Eight pages of field notes describing a rite (tsirim) conducted by Sherpa lamas, with hyperlinks to the ethnographer's house list and dictionary of Sherpa language, and to a glossary.

Fürer-Haimendorf field notes on yak migration, with hyperlinks
Four pages of field notes summarizing what the ethnographer has learned about the annual migrations of the yak owners of Khumjung, Nepal, with hyperlinks to closely related field materials.